Treat your .NET Minimal API Endpoint as the application layer

2023-06-14

In this blog post, Tim Deschryver discusses using as few layers as possible to keep your applications structure easy to navigate. He introduces the Request Endpoint Response (REPR) pattern, which works well with the Command Query Responsibility Segregation (CQRS) pattern, and explains how leveraging a minimal API endpoint as the application layer can simplify the code and help reduce endless discussions about the correct way of doing things. By treating the endpoint as an application layer, Devs can chop their endpoints into single files, each defining its request object, endpoint, and the response object, and have clear intentions and purposes for each layer. This post is a continuation of a previous post on rethinking project structure with .NET 6.

Link [ https://timdeschryver.dev/blog/treat-your-net-minimal-api-endpoint-as-the-application-layer ]

Previous Article

Treat your .NET Minimal API Endpoint as the application layer

2023-06-14

In this blog post, Tim Deschryver discusses using as few layers as possible to keep your applications structure easy to navigate. He introduces the Request Endpoint Response (REPR) pattern, which works well with the Command Query Responsibility Segregation (CQRS) pattern, and explains how leveraging a minimal API endpoint as the application layer can simplify the code and help reduce endless discussions about the correct way of doing things. By treating the endpoint as an application layer, Devs can chop their endpoints into single files, each defining its request object, endpoint, and the response object, and have clear intentions and purposes for each layer. This post is a continuation of a previous post on rethinking project structure with .NET 6.

Link [ https://timdeschryver.dev/blog/treat-your-net-minimal-api-endpoint-as-the-application-layer ]

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