The Developer Ecosystem in 2023: Key Trends for C#

2023-12-01

We’ve captured insights from 26,348 developers worldwide in our annual Developer Ecosystem Survey 2023. This recap focuses on C# and .NET, but you can see what’s trending in other languages as well. Enjoy the results and commentary, and let us know what you think! We know that ASP.NET Core is the most used .NET framework by C# developers – 56% use it. But Blazor just simply hasn’t had the uptake that Microsoft was hoping for. Blazor Server is only 16% of the ASP.NET development landscape with Blazor WebAssembly at 12%. More developers use the Minimal API feature (20%), released after Blazor. So for full-stack and frontend development we’re at 64% of ASP.NET devs using MVC and 40% using Razor Pages. While Aspire has just been released and is too new to be included in this survey, we’re keeping an eye on it to see what happens in the next year. Microsoft is going full force with the message With .NET 8, every developer is a full stack developer (in the cloud). Poornima Nayar stated APIs are everywhere and the fact that 78% voted for ASP.NET Core technologies proves that! Does this also mean that we are seeing a shift in the way applications are built? Looking at “Types of software being developed in Visual Studio and JetBrains Rider” it looks like websites are the most popular choice. So what other technologies and frameworks are being used for web applications? And what other types of applications are being developed that uses Web APIs? C# developers mostly run Windows and keep up to date. This should come as no surprise: 79% of C# developers are using Windows, followed by 32% on MacOS and 19% on Linux. As new C# versions are released, there is steady adoption, as versions 11 and 10 are at 42% and 32%, respectively. As well, a smaller but significant number of legacy apps always stay behind, often for good reasons. Since 2017, C# developers who say I’m not sure about which version of C# they use have steadily grown in number. Lou Creemers stated What a joy to notice that we as C# developers are staying up to date with the C# versions that we use. 74% on C# 10 or higher makes it possible to get the most out of language, not only behind closed doors but also in Open-Source projects. C# developers build games, websites, utilities.

Link [ https://blog.jetbrains.com/dotnet/2023/11/30/the-developer-ecosystem-in-2023-key-trends-for-csharp/ ]

Previous Article

The Developer Ecosystem in 2023: Key Trends for C#

2023-12-01

We’ve captured insights from 26,348 developers worldwide in our annual Developer Ecosystem Survey 2023. This recap focuses on C# and .NET, but you can see what’s trending in other languages as well. Enjoy the results and commentary, and let us know what you think! We know that ASP.NET Core is the most used .NET framework by C# developers – 56% use it. But Blazor just simply hasn’t had the uptake that Microsoft was hoping for. Blazor Server is only 16% of the ASP.NET development landscape with Blazor WebAssembly at 12%. More developers use the Minimal API feature (20%), released after Blazor. So for full-stack and frontend development we’re at 64% of ASP.NET devs using MVC and 40% using Razor Pages. While Aspire has just been released and is too new to be included in this survey, we’re keeping an eye on it to see what happens in the next year. Microsoft is going full force with the message With .NET 8, every developer is a full stack developer (in the cloud). Poornima Nayar stated APIs are everywhere and the fact that 78% voted for ASP.NET Core technologies proves that! Does this also mean that we are seeing a shift in the way applications are built? Looking at “Types of software being developed in Visual Studio and JetBrains Rider” it looks like websites are the most popular choice. So what other technologies and frameworks are being used for web applications? And what other types of applications are being developed that uses Web APIs? C# developers mostly run Windows and keep up to date. This should come as no surprise: 79% of C# developers are using Windows, followed by 32% on MacOS and 19% on Linux. As new C# versions are released, there is steady adoption, as versions 11 and 10 are at 42% and 32%, respectively. As well, a smaller but significant number of legacy apps always stay behind, often for good reasons. Since 2017, C# developers who say I’m not sure about which version of C# they use have steadily grown in number. Lou Creemers stated What a joy to notice that we as C# developers are staying up to date with the C# versions that we use. 74% on C# 10 or higher makes it possible to get the most out of language, not only behind closed doors but also in Open-Source projects. C# developers build games, websites, utilities.

Link [ https://blog.jetbrains.com/dotnet/2023/11/30/the-developer-ecosystem-in-2023-key-trends-for-csharp/ ]

Copyright © 2024 All rights reserved

Rss

Atom